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ABOUT US - EUROPEAN DOBERMANS - KENNEL CANIS MAXIMUS



EUROPEAN DOBERMAN THE KENNEL CANIS MAXIMUS Welcome to the website dedicated to his Majesty, The Doberman! Dobermans! A true perfection! Sleek, elegant, powerful, agile, smart, intelligent, devoted, a true companion!

Before you decide that this breed is right for you, familiarize yourself with the most common health problems.

The truth is, dogs don't live as long as humans. So, you WILL go through the loss and related heartache. Dogs die of old age. Dogs die of diseases, or in accidents. Dogs get killed and euthanized. All this is a BIG world of heartache. If you want to get a dog, you will have to go through stage 1, which is puppyhood, and to the last stage, which is losing your companion. Sadly, Dobermans have several serious conditions that are widely spread in the breed: vWD, DCM, Wobblers, cataracts, CAH. Those are most common in this breed. Since it's a man-made breed, we, the breeders, made our favorite breed prone to so many health problems. Mostly due to the lack of knowledge, lack of breeder honesty, and a great deal of overbreeding certain lines.

vWD is the easiest of them all. The only thing you need to worry about is that your dog cannot be vWD-affected. Many people think that being a carrier means being sick. This is not true. It's either no vWD gene (clear), or one gene (carrier), or both genes (affected). Only a vWD-affected dog can develop a bleeding disorder. And even if the dog is affected, it can still lead a normal life and not display any clinical symptoms. The latter being normally a rule rather than an exception, hence it is known as vWD Type I - least affected. Combinations that won't produce affected dogs: clear to clear, clear to carrier, affected to clear. So, please, read, learn and don't ask me why we breed vWD-carriers, those are clinically healthy dogs!

DCM. If somebody tells you they don't have DCM in their lines, it's either a lie, or ignorance, or great luck (and I'd love to get their contact info so that we can use DCM-free lines to improve overall health in Dobermans). One breeder can't fix it. And even a dozen breeders won't be able to fix this problem. DCM has been in this breed all along. But only in the past decade or so it spiraled out of control due to overbreeding popular studs who carried DCM. There are several clinical studies under way. Dr. Meurs has developed a DNA test for one mutated gene that might be the culprit. However, it is clear that gene is not the only cause of the problem. I always research pedigrees. I know which dogs died young, which - old. Nowadays, 'clear' lines have been crossed with 'affected' lines so much that, even if a dog lives past 10, it can still be a carrier and pass DCM on to the progeny. So, without science we won't be able to solve this problem. I try to use studs that are around 8 years old or track the longevity of the parents and grandparents, which is not easy.

Losing a dog to DCM is devastating. That experience turned upside down our views on breeding. We weren't really planning on becoming breeders to begin with. But our first litter turned out to be a big hit. All dogs were stylish, extremely powerful, with gorgeous heads and chests, and with a lot of presence. One male became an International CH. Two more siblings went to compete and get certified in Obedience and Protection. At this time, when it's extremely hard to find a cardio-safe line, without an established genetic test, it's only up to the breeder's intuition and extensive research to make the right choice. We learned it the hardest way. And that's why our main target is great health in a good-looking doberman. Every breeding takes months of preparation. Every breeding has a reason. This is the main reason why our puppies will never go to a breeder or a mass producer or to somebody who doesn't know how to handle a doberman.

HD. It's an inheritable condition. And with mandatory HD screening in Europe, I see fewer and fewer dogs with hip problems. It's easy to breed out hip problems. It's also easy to get it back. It's also a fact that after 20 generations of HD-free dogs, you can still end up with one dysplastic dog. How you feed and exercise your dog can be a major factor as well. The bigger the dog the higher chance of HD. So, bigger is not always better.

Wobblers. I know it exists. I never saw it.

Skin. I've also noticed an increase in immune and skin issues. Many of those can be attributed to the environment.

The rest is up to Mother Nature. There are hundreds of known genetic diseases. Just keep in mind that we are not assembling cars here, we can't take a part out and get it replaced. How genes line up is beyond any breeder's control. But good news is: the better the breeding, the more health screening done, the healthier the ancestors - the better the offsprings!

I am not your typical US breeder. You cannot expect certain things from our kennel that you would expect from an average American breeder. Please read this page so that there are no misunderstandings or false expectations.

I do not understand breeding if you do not show. I just don't. Wouldn't a breeder want to show off his/her results? It's any kennel's pride - a home-bred champion! But breeding just to breed? Breeding companion dogs? What is companion dog breeding if all dogs, champions or not champions, were designed by nature, by evolution to be a man's best friend and companion.
European breeders aim at making progress, achieving better results, breeding better dogs, show or working, etc.That's why there are shows and working trials. It's not just for those crazy owners to go run around the ring with their dog. It's a breeder's assesment, an exam. A breeding that didn't produce worthwhile dogs for future selection and showing is a step back for any breeder, it's lost opportunities. And with a short breeding life of our companion dogs, such mistakes have a huge impact on any breeder's program.

A European breeder normally has a few dogs, many of the pups go to show homes. Not because it's mandatory but because people actually enjoy gathering together. A weekend show is a full day event. Lots of excitement, very eventful. And most important - dogs and people united by the same passion. There are a few major dog shows in Europe. IDC - International Doberman Club. The most prestigious doberman-only show. World Dog Show - that's when dogs can become World Winners. European Show - European Winner. Every country falling under FCI (a big canine organization that has all European and many South American and some other countries as its members) has a breed club that oversees breeding, various requirements and breed regulations. This breed club organizes Nationals every year. That's when breeders show their results. Local only. Also, all member countries have a few CACIB shows every year (the number depends on the size of the country) - these shows usually attract the greatest amount of dogs because of the chance to win an International Champion Candidacy. Your dog will need a few from different judges and countries to become an International Champion. These shows are very competitive. And these shows are the most fun. You do not need to have an expensive handler to win a show. Most often, it's your dog, not the handler, who is judged. And this is what attracts me in European shows. We've tried AKC shows but still prefer showing in Europe. The spirit is different.

Breed clubs also oversee what tests and working trials have to be performed before a dog can be bred. National clubs have a set list of requirements. You can't just breed a dog to a dog and get the litter registered. It's simply unheard.
Normally, you'd be expected to have shown your dog at least one - with an adequate result. Hips will have to be checked. And some training certificates have to be obtained if you have a working or a hunting dog.
All this puts European breeding at a much higher level.

When European buyers start looking for a pup, they normally refer to the Internet and visit dog shows. NOBODY asks for references. You will look like a fool if you did. Why? Because of what was said above about breeding ethics. Also, kennel websites usually have updates about show results of their 'products' which gives the buyer an idea of the quality. Nobody really cares about the numbers as do American breeders. My understanding is that this happens solely due to an outrageous number of poorly bred dogs that end up euthanized in shelters.

There aren't as many puppy mills in Europe as in the US. One reason - tradition and values. Second reason - living conditions. Not many people live in detached homes with acres of land. Third reason - dog food usually costs about 3 times more. Fourth reason - time. People work and have dogs as hobbies. Enjoyable addition. Stress-reliever. Companionship. Reason to jump on a bus and spend 2 days driving all over Europe to get to that magical place - IDC show. Fifth reason - dogs have to be shown, and working dogs have to be trained. Otherwise, no papers for the pups. Which means, no buyers for them either.

You can't compare us to anyone else involved in raising Dobermans in the United States. There are hundreds of backyard breeders breeding without even knowing what they breed. There are dozens of commercial breeders breeding for the sake of money. Then there are hundreds of show kennels breeding for conformation... quite often overlooking the working abilities of the breed. Then there are a few dozen kennels breeding working dogs... very often overlooking the conformation of their breeding dogs. And then there are kennels which don't breed for the sake of money, which do know what and why they breed and which breed for the sake of both conformation and working skills of the breed. And that is us.

Our goal is not as utopic as that of most breeders that try to breed "The Total Dobe". We believe that breeding should be realistic and results achievable. Thus, we put a lot of effort into breeding and importing dogs with excellent temperaments and of sound structure and good health history. We love strong bodies with good angulation, short backs and correct heads with very strong jaws. Of great importance are also the width and depth of the chest as well as the bone density. So, basically, it's an intelligent dog with a very strong but harmonious look - that's what we love!

Our breeding Ethics is different from the majority of American breeders because most of our valuable show and training experiences came from Europe. We believe that traveling several thousand miles across the world for training or breeding is worth the result and expense. We also believe that importing a few pups with valuable bloodlines is done for the betterment of the kennel or the breed itself. We also think the breeder has to be honest about the quality of his/her breeding not only with the buyers but with himself/herself as well. There is nothing worse in the dog world than illusions or deceipt.

We think that the Doberman is a working breed and our greatest interest is in maintaining working talents and skills of this breed. However, I do not support how Schutzhund handlers treat their dogs. You don't need to jerk and yell "Plaaaaaaz!" at the top of your voice. I swear, if I were a dog, I'd get a heart attack from how commands are yelled nowadays. A true working dog will obey even if you whisper. I don't like the usage of electric collars in training. A true working dog doesn't need that. However, if it's set on vibrations, it can be a powerful tool.

All our puppies are family raised - this gives them a good start in life. But the long journey to obedience and a great dog is done by the owner. You can train pretty much any dog that was raised and bred properly. This doesn't mean it will become a superb working dog. What I've come to realize is that it is easier to find a home able to handle low/medium-energy level dog than a high-energy dog. Out of the dogs returned, most of them were higher-energy, thus requiring more time and dedication from the owner. My goal is to breed a dog that will be an all-round good and manageable companion dog you can be active with. We also breed to preserve what the breed was intended for: guarding and protection. These two goals have to be carried out separately. Working lines have to be preserved and maintained - as there are fewer owners for such dogs. We do have dogs that will make real working dogs, and you have to inquire specifically what your working goals are, Schutzhund, Agility or just basic obedience, so that we can direct you to the right bloodline.

We pick breeding combinations based on our lengthy show and training experience. Breeders who never showed or trained a dog will not be able to pick the right partners, nor could/should they make claims regarding show or work potential of the litter. Breeding titles and names are not a guarantee of the pup's quality. But the breeder's intuition, knowledge and experience are what creates a top-quality litter and top-quality dogs. How many breeders can boast that?!

VERY important things that any potential buyer should be aware of while searching for a working breed puppy: breed surveys, temperament tests, Schutzhund/IPO or any similar training AND showing - all this DETERMINES WHAT DOG SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE BRED. Without training scores and showing titles, or with poor scores and poor conformation, the dog is NOT SUITABLE for breeding. And if a breeder tells you that trophies don't matter - this is the biggest FLAG you can get, run away. DO NOT buy from a breeder who doesn't do any of the required work with their breeding dogs. Same philosophy is applied to those who buy 'ready-made' dogs from Europe titled by previous owners with the only purpose of breeding and making money.

Many people ask us for a "pet puppy". You have to draw a distinct line between "a pet-quality puppy" and "a puppy as a pet, companion". You can have your dog as a pet, as a police dog as a jogging buddy, this will not change the dog's quality. And it doesn't matter if you want to show it or not. We, as breeders who are involved in showing, evaluate each puppy according to the conformation standard. A pet-quality puppy may not be up to the high conformation level but will still make a great dog. Such dogs will never be priced as those that have show/work potential. The latter will never be priced as pet-quality dogs either.

"Canis Maximus" (which means "The Great Dog" in Latin) works only with most valuable European bloodlines.. We train, show and do health tests on all our dogs used in breeding. We carefully select what we breed, when we breed and where we breed. Every dog has to bring something valuable to the gene pool. Otherwise, why breed?!

Many people ask us if we have parents on site. We are not a big kennel, so we are not able to keep dozens of studs for us to make our selection. We'd rather spend our money on flying our best females to Europe, to its prominent studs and bring something NEW and FRESH to the States. So, no, we hardly ever have both parents on site. Always having both parents on-site is another FLAG you should remember. This means the breeder is following the philosophy of convenience: breed to what's available. This is not proper breeding which is supposed to be based on selection.

We've got little kids. Kids are allowed to play with the puppies and the dogs on a daily basis. We allow puppies to learn and explore. They learn to walk on hardwood floors, linoleum, tile, concrete, asphalt and grass. All of this gives pups a great intellectual boost.
We allow visitors. All of this means that our puppies leave our kennel with a good set of social skills, the rest will depend on how well you are prepared to be an owner of one of our creations. We have no cats.

PLEASE-PLEASE-PLEASE!!! Read the links on the For Sale page. The pricing is there.
To give you a rough idea how much we spend on raising ONE pup, here are some numbers:
- $3000-6000 - training mom/dad.
- $1000-2000+ - shipping expenses.
- $700-1000 - health testing.
- $1000+ - showing.
- $300+ - docking, vaccinations.

-------------------------------------------------
Multiply this by TWO if we use our own stud. Or add $1000-2000 for the stud fee.
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Divide by the number of pups and you will get the cost of raising ONE puppy. A good quality puppy will cost you around $2000 anywhere in the States. European prices are reaching American prices too. French, German, etc. pups will cost you 1200-1500 euro, plus shipping. Even in Eastern Europe prices are steadily going up. So, as you see, a good dog will cost good money no matter where you are.
Then there is the principle of the fair market. Just like with houses: look around. A puppy of a certain pedigree/origin out of parents of a particular look, titles, with health tests will cost $$$ or $$$$. You calculate the average you'd be expected to pay. Then you look at puppies that are of a different origin out of untitled parents. It will be $$ or $. You calculate the average. Even if you are the best owner in the world, you cannot expect a $$$ puppy fall into the $ price category. Same with houses. No matter what your personal qualities are or how well you are going to maintain the house, it will cost $300k if similar houses in that area sell for $300K.

A LEXUS shouldn't and won't cost the same as a TOYOTA, right? Same applies to every product in our life. Puppies are a product of our hard work, enthusiasm, sleepless nights, high expenses. So, think twice before you skip the information we made available on the site just for you, and call us with the same and only question: "How much do your puppies run for?"

We can justify the prices on our pups - draw conclusions. You get what you pay for. Of course, you can have a great dog for $500 but you can also end up with a long list of genetic conditions or bad temper or a dog that doesn't resemble a good quality doberman and no breeder support. For me, a doberman has to look like a doberman. Think like a doberman, behave like a doberman. Live like a doberman. And smell like a doberman. I do not take less. This is a whole package. And that's why I am forever a doberman fan. If you can overlook any of the components, then good luck. Just keep in mind, that unqualified and not very professional breeding practices will keep existing and growing if there is a demand.

Judge the breeder by the results.
Always ask yourself: where will my money go? Will it be spent on credit card bills, or household purchases, or will it be spent on improving the breed and supporting the breeding standard and the breeder's program.

2010 Results

New Champions:

- Kadir z Padoku

- Sant Kreal Shaherezada

- Zara di Altobello

- Zaphira v.d. Horringhauser Hoeh


Our New Working titles

- Kadir z Padoku

- Zara di Altobello

- Zaphira v.d. Horringhauser Hoeh


Reported diseases

2010

Total YTD

Hip Displasya

0

1

Elbow Displasya

0

0

Thyroid

0

0

DCM

0

0

Stenosis

1

1

Demodex (generalized form only)

0

2

Renal failure

1

2

Wobblers

0

0

vWD (clinical symptoms)

0

0


Dogs tested for DCM (DNA)

13

Negative

11

Positive

2


2011 Results

New Champions:

- Ability Delberta Delorean

- Sant Kreal Shaherezada

- A'Donikons Iskander


Our New Working titles

- Sant Kreal Shaherezada

- Ability Delberta Delorean

- A'Donikons Iskander


Reported diseases

2011

Total YTD

Hip Displasya

0

1

Elbow Displasya

0

0

Thyroid

0

0

DCM

0

0

Stenosis

0

1

Demodex (generalized form only)

1

3

Renal failure

0

2

Wobblers

0

0

vWD (clinical symptoms)

0

0


Once you are familiar with the breed problems, determine if your lifestyle is suitable for raising a puppy. Puppies don't mature intellectually until much much later. Will you be able to handle chewed table corners? Or your expensive shoes? Will you be able to handle daily walking and various activities? Will you be able to handle veterinary bills if there are any health issues? Where will the dog be while you are work? What if you decide to get married/have a baby/move? What if you lose your job and guaranteed income? What if your dog develops behavior issues that you were a cause for? Where will the dog be if you go on vacation? What if your dog turns out to be high energy?

These are the questions you need answers for BEFORE you get a dog.

Then:
1. Set your budget. If your budget can only afford you a puppymill quality dog, why not adopt? Or save and buy later?
2. Find the breeder. Start looking in advance, narrow down to a handful. Maybe initiate the first contact. But save serious inquiries for when you are close to purchasing.
3. Know what you want. Color/gender/size/activity level.
What's good for you may not be good for someone else.
4. Analyze breedings, parent pictures, quality of offsprings produced in the past, and health tests/titles.
5. Schedule a visit.
A good, intuitive breeder will be able to describe characteristics of each particular puppy.
And listen to your heart!

Always maintain contact with your breeder.

Keep in mind that
1. Quality of puppies produced, and
2. How the breeder handles buyer or sold puppy problems,
are your best safeguards in puppy searching.

With all this said, enjoy the website and our truly great Dobermans! - CM


CONTACT - KENNEL CANIS MAXIMUS
jugingrand@yahoo.com

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